Are you the best?

Do you avoid doing any part of your business? For some it is bookkeeping, emails, calling clients. For me, I have been avoiding this task of writing and blogging. For those of you who know me, you are saying ‘Whaaaat?!’. I have been avoiding putting my thoughts down to avoid the criticism or lack of perfection. This blog will also act as the first newsletter I send out to my subscribers!

What if it is not good enough? What if what I have to say is not important? What I am going to say any differently than the next speaker?

On a recent road trip with my small family, my daughter’s 2.5 year old wisdom reminded me of why it can be done. There is no perfection, except in her eyes! Our planning was meticulous: leave at noon, she will be asleep by 12:45 (yes it happened!), sleep until 2:30 (she did!), stop, eat, play and move on. It all worked out until an hour prior to our destination. The ‘ugly’ toddler emerged, whining and generally being unpleasant (in the live version of this story, I use more creative language).

After some playful banter and finding a fascination for the Greater Toronto Area skyline (because you never run out of buildings to count), I asked Adèle a question: ‘What is your favorite part of the road trip?’ She promptly answered, without hesitation: ‘ME!’ We were stunned and laughed with her and her candid honesty.

When was the last time you said you were the best? We rarely use ‘the best’ as a descriptor because it sounds a little pompous and maybe arrogant. I am sure though you have moments where you feel like, I’ve got this!

20160521_135251

I am the best!

Speaking falls in the best or not so best ranking. Whether it is a follow up call, a small work presentation or putting your words in a blog/newsletter, you may have to remind yourself to be your BEST. My 7 tips to a top notch presentation will help you engage, have fun and feel lighter in your every day speaking encounters. This week I created a video (https://youtu.be/QUHijAn4K8w) with Facebook Live for parents and shared getting your teen ready for a presentation:

Have a simple structure: a beginning, middle and an end.

  • Start with a question to engage your audience, a fact or statistic. Tell them what your objective is for the presentation.
  • Develop the middle with concrete points supported by stories (making it personal keeps the audience interested). Keep it to a maximum of three main points.
  • Wrap up your presentation with a call to action. What do you want your audience to do? What is the take away for them?

When in doubt, ask yourself: ‘who is the best?’ and ‘ME’ should be the answer. Take it from Adèle, she is the best!

Authentically,

Nathalie

Leave a Reply